Hill, G. (2009) A Framework for Valuing the Quality of Customer Information

Abstract

This thesis addresses a widespread, significant and persistent problem in Information Systems practice: under-investment in the quality of customer information. Many organisations require clear financial models in order to undertake investments in their information systems and related processes. However, there are no widely accepted approaches to rigorously articulating the costs and benefits of potential quality improvements to customer information. This can result in poor quality customer information which impacts on wider organisational goals.

To address this problem, I develop and evaluate a framework for producing financial models of the costs and benefits of customer information quality interventions. These models can be used to select and prioritise from multiple candidate interventions across various customer processes and information resources, and to build a business case for the organisation to make the investment.

Citation Gregory Hill (2009). A Framework for Valuing the Quality of Customer Information (Doctoral Thesis, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia). Doctoral Thesis

BibTex entry for this thesis:

BibTex entry for this thesis:

@phdthesis{hill2009framework,
address = {Melbourne, Australia},
author = {Hill, Gregory},
pages = {1--194},
school = {University of Melbourne},
title = {{A Framework for Valuing the Quality of Customer Information}},
type = {Doctoral Thesis},
url = {http://ghill.customer.netspace.net.au/docs/summary.html},
year = {2009}
}

Table of contents

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Chapter 2 - Research Method and Design

  • 2.2 Introduction to Design Science
  • 2.3 Motivation
  • 2.4 Goals of the Research Design
  • 2.5 Employing Design Science in Research
  • 2.6 Overall Research Design
  • 2.7 Assessment of Research Design

Chapter 3 - Literature Review

  • 3.2 Information Quality
  • 3.3 Existing IQ Frameworks
  • 3.4 IQ Measurement
  • 3.5 Customer Relationship Management
  • 3.6 Decision Process Modelling

Chapter 4 - Context Interviews

  • 4.2 Rationale
  • 4.3 Subject Recruitment
  • 4.4 Data Collection Method
  • 4.5 Data Analysis Method
  • 4.6 Key Findings

Chapter 5 - Conceptual Study

  • 5.2 Practical Requirements
  • 5.3 Theoretical Basis
  • 5.4 Components
  • 5.5 Usage
  • 5.6 Conclusion

Chapter 6 - Simulations

  • 6.2 Philosophical Basis
  • 6.3 Scenarios
  • 6.4 Experimental Process
  • 6.5 Results and derivations
  • 6.6 Application to Method
  • 6.7 Conclusion

Chapter 7 - Research Evaluation

  • 7.2 Evaluation in Design Science
  • 7.3 Presentation of Framework as Artefact
  • 7.4 Assessment Guidelines
    • 7.4.1 Design as an Artefact
    • 7.4.2 Problem Relevance
    • 7.4.3 Design Evaluation
    • 7.4.4 Research Contributions
    • 7.4.5 Research Rigour
    • 7.4.6 Design as a Search Process
    • 7.4.7 Communication as Research

Chapter 8 - Conclusion

Key ideas

Notes

Keywords:

Design Science Research, Doctor of Philosophy

Print/export